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Georgia Taxes Girl Scouts While Giving Tax Break to Foreign Corporations

March 9, 2011

HB 385 would tax essentials, like food, and these taxes are regressive. Shame on Georgia!
BUT, Coca-Cola will receive a tax break and other foreign corporations will also get a tax break.

Think Progress reports: Like many states, Georgia is facing a budget shortfall. To address the problem, the legislature is considering a bill – HB 385 – that would expand the tax base by doing things like reinstating a sales tax on food and raising the tax on gasoline.

Many Georgians would be adversely affected by the tax hikes on basic commodities, including the Girl Scouts, who are worried about the “significant financial impact” the bill would have on the revenue they raise through cookie sales, which would now be subject to sales tax. Over the weekend, Marilyn Midyette, the CEO of Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, sent an email to supporters warning them that the new tax on their cookies “would take money away from Girl Scout programs“:

This significant financial impact would take money away from Girl Scout programs, camp support, financial aid and proceeds from the sale that support troop activities and community service projects.

Tax Break for Foreign Corporations
While Girl Scouts and anyone who buys groceries and gasoline is forced to sacrifice, domestic and foreign corporations in Georgia are being lavished with a tax break. The same bill that raises taxes on Girl Scouts Cookies lowers tax rates on corporate income, from 6 percent this year to just 4 percent in 2014:

(a)(1)(A) For any taxable year beginning prior to January 1, 2012, every Every
967 domestic corporation and every foreign corporation shall pay annually an income tax
968 equivalent to 6 percent of its Georgia taxable net income. […]

975 (D) For any taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2014, every domestic
976 corporation and every foreign corporation shall pay annually an income tax equivalent
977 to 4 percent of its Georgia taxable net income

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