Home > Economy, Insights and Commentary, Trends > Subaru Rules in Safe Car Picks for 2011

Subaru Rules in Safe Car Picks for 2011

January 12, 2011

I am on my third Subaru Outback and I love my car. I am so pleased to hear today the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety state…Subaru, with five awards, is the only automaker with a winner in each of the categories in which it competed.

VIEW THE ENTIRE LIST FROM IIHS, CLICK HERE

To determine crashworthiness — how well a vehicle protects its occupants in a crash — the Institute rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor based on performance in high-speed front and side crash tests, a rollover test, plus evaluations of seat/head restraints for protection against neck injuries in rear impacts. To earn Top Safety Pick for 2011 a vehicle must have good ratings in all four Institute tests. In addition, the winning vehicles must offer electronic stability control.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety revealed on Wednesday its picks for the safest vehicles of 2011.

Sixty-six models — including 40 cars, 25 sport utility vehicles and one minivan — earned the Top Safety Pick award. Only 27 vehicles received that distinction last year after the Insurance Institute added a roof-strength parameter to its test criteria.

As 2010 progressed, 58 vehicles were ultimately named Top Safety Picks. Owing to automakers’ efforts to strengthen roofs and make changes to air bags, 2011 begins with a much larger list.

Hyundai (including Kia) and Volkswagen (including Audi) are the most heavily represented brands, with nine awards each. General Motors (Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet and GMC); Ford (including Lincoln) and Toyota (including Lexus and Scion) each have eight winners. Subaru, with five awards, is the only automaker with a winner in each of the categories in which it competed.

The award recognizes vehicles that do the best job of protecting passengers in the institute’s crash testing. These are vehicles that earn the highest rating of Good (on a scale of Good, Fair, Marginal, Poor) in the institute’s front, side, rollover — which measures roof strength — and rear-impact tests. They also must be equipped with or offer electronic stability control as an option.

In 2009 more than 12,000 people in the United States died in frontal crashes, more than 6,000 in side impacts and more than 8,000 in rollovers, according to the institute.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: