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Vitamin ‘B’ Slows Brain Shrinkage

January 2, 2011

A series of different studies this past year have revealed the importance of B-12 related to Alzheimers and homocysteine levels.

Alzheimer’s and other dementias will afflict 35.6 million people in 2010, and cases will rise to 115.4 million by 2050, according to a report from Alzheimer’s Disease International, based in London.

Taking vitamin B slowed the rate that the brain shrank in elderly people who had trouble remembering, University of Oxford scientists found in a study that may guide further research into Alzheimer’s disease.

Vitamins B6 and B12, as well as folic acid, lowered the levels of an amino acid called homocysteine that is linked to brain-cell damage similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s. Those with the highest levels of homocysteine in their blood showed the most benefit, according to the study published today in PLoS One, a publication of the Public Library of Science.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-09-09/vitamin-b-could-slow-advance-of-alzheimer-s-oxford-university-study-shows.html

Related story: Vitamin B-12 Linked to Lowering Alzheimers

Oct. 18, 2010 — Vitamin B12 may help protect the brain against Alzheimer’s disease, according to new evidence that suggests the vitamin and an amino acid called homocysteine may both be involved in the development of Alzheimer’s.

High levels of vitamin B12 in the blood are already known to help reduce levels of homocysteine, which has been linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss, and stroke. But researchers say the relationship between homocysteine and vitamin B12 levels and Alzheimer’s disease risk has been unclear.

Entire article, click here

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  1. January 9, 2011 at 10:17 am

    I take b12 every day because I’m a vegan. I am so happy to hear that it will also protect my brain, as I will need it for many years to come.

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